“8 Wondrous Bridges to Nowhere” Discussion Thread

Welcome to the discussion thread for the list, 8 Wondrous Bridges to Nowhere. You can share your comments and thoughts about the story in the conversation below.

You might check out a similar blog I wrote on this topic via Word Press. Click on the link below. I always welcome new followers.

Hello, I hope I am doing this correctly. I have a bridge that would be nice to add to this list. Not sure it is “wondrous” but it is really interesting. You can no longer drive on there as it is closed off to traffic but we have walked on it. Here is a wikipedia link but there are other results with a quick search.

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My first thought was of the Pont d’Avignon, officially Pont Saint-Bénézet, which is a bridge-to-nowhere that has its own 16th century theme song, as well as its own chapel. It currently costs 5 Euros to not cross it.

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Here is one that was built in this century.

Built as a research facility, with the intent of making connections later, it’s now a bridge to nowhere.

Isle of Lewis in Scotland’s own “bridge to nowhere”. Beautiful location - it is Scotland, after all.
Lovely car park and beach just below. Spent a rather windy overnight there in our motorhome.

Isle of Lewis’ Bridge to Nowhere, Outer Hebrides

Here’s one that made a big impression on me when I saw it first-hand on a visit to Dandong over 30 years ago.

Here is one in NC, underwater bridge to nowhere.
Abrams Creek Underwater Bridge

Hi one from my country, New Zealand…

Old US Hwy 45 Bridge, Tombigbee River

Monroe County, Mississippizzzzzjndmdmd

Most People Don’t Know The Story Behind Oklahoma’s Abandoned Bridge To Nowhere

The Margaret Hunt Hill Bridge, a Calatrava-designed structure is know locally as the “Bridge to Nowhere”. The following link implies that, five years after its completion,

perhaps it is going somewhere http://www.bcnuej.org/2019/09/25/how-west-dallas-became-somewhere-except-for-its-residents/

I also recently saw a documentary about an unfinished bridge between Mocoa and Pasto in the Columbian state of Putumayo. It’s huge suspension bridge over a valley of the rainforest that just ends where it meets the next mountain. Here the trailer to the documentary: YouTube

The folk song has been taught to generations of French language students.

The Bridge To Nowhere is a concrete road bridge spanning the Mangapurua Stream in the Whanganui National Park. It has no roads leading to it, but it is accessible by mountain bike or tramping on a variety of different tracks, or by boat or kayak, followed by a 45-minute (one way) walk along maintained bush trails.**

The Bridge To Nowhere is an icon within the Whanganui National Park and a major visitor destination. A wooden swing bridge was constructed across the Mangapurua Stream in 1919. This connected the isolated valley with the riverboats that brought goods along the Whanganui River. However the settlers had always expected that roading access would be improved – a more solid bridge would be built and that it would form part of a road between Raetihi and Taranaki.

Planning for the new bridge started when the timber bridge began to rot. In 1936 the new steel-reinforced concrete bridge was finally opened. It was an impressive sight at nearly 40 metres above the river within the steep ravine walls. Today, you can still see the remains of the old swing bridge from the concrete Bridge To Nowhere that replaced it.

By the time construction of the Bridge To Nowhere was finished, many of the Mangapurua settlers had abandoned their holdings. The physical labour and economic hardship had taken their toll on the returned servicemen and their families. Serious erosion (caused by the clearing of bush), flooding and poor road access were other obstacles that the settlers could no longer overcome.

By 1942 only three of the farmers remained in the valley. They were eventually forced to leave when the government decided that road access would no longer be maintained. By 1944, everyone had gone. Not only that, they left virtually penniless.

The Bridge To Nowhere gets more use now than it did when it was first built. It is the unofficial flagship of Whanganui National Park and a major visitor attraction on the Whanganui Journey – one of New Zealand’s Great Walks.