Abrams Creek Underwater Bridge

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A high friend and I used to scuba dive on this bridge back in the late 1980s. Maybe did three or four dives at that place. Water was clear mostly but did get a little murky down deep. Seems like it was around 30 to 40 feet deep to the bottom. I remember that the silt was heavy on the bridge and we had stirred it up and visibility was pretty bad and I almost went headfirst into a chopped truck bed that had been deposited in the water and landed on the bridge.

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Wow - if I remember, my first open water dive for certification was Abrams Creek - sometime around the mid 1980’s. I really thought the underwater bridge was pretty widely know - well at least locally. About 100 yards upstream Abrams Creek from the bridge, I decended about 30 feet and hit the hood of a car - very silty and low vis - explored around the car and found it to be a Porsche 914 - it was in very good condition. I took the hood badge off the car. Surfaced to let my buddy know - we used the rest of our air and never found the car again - if it was not for still having the hood badge, it would almost seems like an odd dream.

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Used to see roads going down into Lake Barkley or Kentucky Lake down at Land Between the Lakes. Haven’t been there since the early 80s. Cliff jumping still allowed?

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Nearly every man-made lake in the US has a town, bridge, cemetary, farm or forest under it. I used to teach open water scuba diving in Atlanta and we would do testing on a submerged road near a submerged gas station in Lake Lanier. That lake, like so many othes, was created to be a water reservoir for the city. They did not demolish buildings or cut down trees before filling it. I made decent pocket change there retrieving larger boat anchors from an underwater forest near Lake Lanier Islands…probably 50 or 60 anchors. It was really cold below the thermocline and, in hindsight, fairly dangerous. Very, very creepy diving under the tree limbs. Touching one created an instant cloud of silt that took visibility down to nearly zero.

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Did they solve any cases from finding the stolen cars?