Foods or drinks from history

Any foods or drinks from history that made you curious to try them when you read about them? If you’ve actually gotten a chance to try them, how were they?

One drink I’m curious about comes from the 18th century, which is called ratafia. I’ve never tried it but I’m hoping to get a glass of it at some point.

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I’d definitely give garum a go! Ancient Graeco-Roman fermented fish sauce sounds good/appealingly awful to me… :smile:

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I have had the exact same feeling of attraction/repulsion for that fish sauce!

The Romans also had a type of cheese bread used for offerings. I tried making some once and I clearly did something wrong. Came out as tasteless, greasy hockey pucks. Any god I offered that to would have cursed me on the spot.

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Love this question! I’ve always wanted to try to live on Marilyn Monroe’s diet for a while. A warm glass of milk with two raw eggs in it in the morning, and a steak and five raw carrots at night. It sounds awful, but hey, she was an icon.

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I work in a government publication library and we surprisingly have quite a collection of cookbooks, especially from the Great Depression and WW2 eras. I have to say that they ate pretty interesting things back then.
Here’s an example of a cookbook for nurses who worked at “hospital for the insane”, published in 1918.

There are plenty of weird drink recipes involving milk and eggs.

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WHOA. I would love to know more about that cookbook.

Here’s a link of a digitized cookbook that features similar recipes and more.

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This is totally fascinating. Thank you for this!

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You can also look at restaurant menus from past times here
http://menus.nypl.org

and
http://digital.library.unlv.edu/index.php/collections/menus/early-restaurants-america

They’re fascinating.

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I’m going to scour the Earth seeking the ruins of the Roman temple dedicated to the God of Tasteless, Greasy Hockey Pucks…

Seriously, though, something more appealing that I’d love to try is puls - a farro grain pottage. It looks doable and would be healthier and potentially tastier than greasy pucks and iffy fish sauce!

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If you forge ahead and do Marilyn’s diet, do let me know if your body gains her body’s dimensions. Science - though not the plastic surgery industry aka Silicone Valley - will thank you, not to mention millions of women without her hourglass figure. :wink:

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Ebinger’s original Brooklyn Blackout Cake. The original. Though many attempts have been made to replicate it, apparently none of them come close to the real thing.

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I dont know if this really counts as its pre-history and can’t be replicated haha.

I was reading about Magdalenian Ice age hunter-gatherer society recently for my trip to Spain. I was thinking/ imagining about what it would be like to sit around a fire back in those times ( hearing distant roars and howls of predatory animals ) and eat cooked mammoth or European bison meat.

What would the meat of those animals have tasted like ? Would it have tasted better with the sense of accomplishments of a successful hunt ? would there be a greater sense of solidarity among the eaters ? Would there have been any rituals in the preparation and consumption of the meat ?

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Marginally better than Bowie’s coked-out Thin White Duke days, cigarettes, milk and red bell peppers :joy:

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I made an Ancient Roman beverage, posca, on a whim at midnight this one time. It’s made of vinegar, water, honey, and coriander. It was surprisingly alright. It’s supposed to be drunk at room temperature, and it was ok like that. I did try it with ice as well (most Ancient Romans couldn’t afford freezers) and that way, it was pretty great. It almost had some lemonade vibes going.

I decided to keep the historic beverage adventure going the next night and made xocolātl, the original, Aztec way to eat chocolate (aka hipster chocolate). It’s kind of like hot chocolate with jalapeños instead of milk. Spicy and bitter. You can add honey but I don’t think that helped it. The cooking process also produces tear gas that’ll clear out a kitchen fast.

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Oh David…

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That low carb plan worked well for her.

Wow I’d love to see that cookbook. I worked at the National institute of Mental Health for 33 years and we never were offered cooking advice. Dang! My nurse colleagues will be especially curious about this

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It would be interesting to see some of the Great Depression and WW2 era cookbooks. Even better, a list of the cookbooks and a way to purchase them would be awesome. Heck, a fundraiser for the Government Publications Library.

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