Gastro Obscura New Flavors Club: SANDWICHES!

Welcome back to another edition of Gastro Obscura New Flavors, where WE suggest some new foods for you to go out and try, and we ask YOU to tell us about rare and unique foods that you think we should try.

(Image: Eiliv-Sonas Aceron/Public Domain)

In this edition we want to hear about SANDWICHES! Go out and try a new kind of sandwich that you’ve never had before, and come back to tell us about it. Or if there’s a rare and fascinating sandwich that you’ve discovered on your travels, come tell us about it in the comments. We’d especially love to hear about those hyperlocal sandwiches named or inspired by local figures and events!

Either way, let’s help each other find some new flavors and add a bit more curiosity to our palates in the process. Check out five of our favorite obscure sandwiches from the Atlas Obscura database below, and give them a try if you can!

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Sugar cane shrimp banh mi is my favorite sandwich of all time and one I can only get at a sandwich shop about a mile from my house. This thread just made me hungry for it.

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Holy crap. that just made me incredibly hungry.

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That looks amazing.

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IKR? I am still thinking of getting one despite having had my dinner; the sandwich up there was something I had almost a couple of weeks ago.

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So important question what constitutes a sandwich? We going culinary definition therfore things like pizza, hotdog, and burrito etc count? Or just two slices of bread with filling?

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I’m going with two slices of bread with filling. “Open face” doesn’t apply, that’s just a pie. And for the record I also consider making a sandwich “cooking.” Take me to court.

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Growing up in India, we’d have chutney sandwiches: green mint-cilantro chutney with a slice of cheese on white sandwich bread. Sometimes there was ketchup, sometimes the whole thing was grilled. They were divine sweet-tart-spicy picnic and/or tiffintime staples, with just a little kick from the green chilis and ginger in the chutney.
This is a dressed-up approximation.

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Well that leaves out Danmark’s most famous “sandwich” then smørrebrød (butter bread) an open faced sandwich made by putting butter on a slice of rugbrød (a sourdough whole grain rye bread) and then topping with ingredients. Commonly taken to work for lunch.

How a Farmer’s Open Faced-Sandwich Became a National Danish Dish

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Okay, maybe I’m being too hard on open-faced sandwiches. I’ll allow it.

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Court is now in session… :woman_judge:

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The Danes have a thing with open face sandwiches. For example besides smørrebrød the other open face sandwich that is seen in many restaurants and grocery stores is the Sterneskud(shooting star). Sterneskud its a piece of breaded fried fish and a piece of steamed fish with shrimps, egg, and caviar (fish roe doesn’t have to be true caviar) and a sauce usually romalade but could be another type of mayonnaise based (curry mayonnaise is not uncommon) , asparagus, dill, hardboiled eggs and lemon slices are so common with it as to almost be mandatory and tomato is not uncommon.

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As a person who has been to culinary school in both the States and Denmark, and worked in several types of restaurants on both sides of the pond I would stand with the defense on sandwich making as cooking

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Sandwiches require multiple ingredients and labor, which in my kitchen, is cooking. Sustained.

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Here, we’ll make an official jury pool:

IS MAKING A SANDWICH “COOKING”?

  • Yes
  • No

0 voters

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I think it depends on the sandwich!!! A peanut butter sandwich does not need cooking. But like, a grilled cheese sandwich does! This poll has inadequate options. (I had to vote no. But I don’t like it.)

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:laughing:

It depends on the context in how the word cooking is used and whether one expects exactitude in the use of language.

To cook means to finish the food preparation by heating - Oxford dictionary states that the verb ‘cook’ means prepare (food, a dish, or a meal) by mixing, combining, and heating the ingredients. Of course, cooking without heat does apply to curing, dehydration, and subjecting food to acids but it still stands that the basic composition of ingredients have been altered fundamentally, which would not be the case for most sandwiches that are basically an assembly of ingredients.

Unless you cook bologna before you make it into a sandwich - that counts.

Or you make an Italian panini or a Cuban sandwich but that would still be subject to heat. :wink:

Ceviche, yummmmm.

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See you’re looking at assembly of sandwich from pieces and not components . Even if we take the applying heat version basically all sandwiches have had this process applied to the one ingredient you need to have a sandwich and that is the bread.

Thus is it the same that there’s no cooking if I mix granola and yogurt, or muesli and yogurt together? While I in mixing the two do not do any cooking the difference between muesli and granola is that granola is baked in the oven and muesli is raw ingredients. So at what point is there cooking and then not cooking?

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However pizza, hotdogs and tacos are also sandwiches so…

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It would make much more sense, I suppose, if we’re willing to call Subway employees cooks vs. sandwich makers. :wink:

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