Gotta see 'em all! Visiting all an artist's paintings

Here’s something that may interesting Atlas Obscuralytes, especially those who are into art. In this article, Tracy Chevalier (author of The Girl With the Pearl Earring) discusses Vermeer and details her quest to travel the world to see every single one of his paintings…

As a culture vulture who deliberately travels to see art exhibitions, it definitely resonates with me! It’s a good question, though - is there a particular artist that you’d select for a travel challenge? If you had to choose an artist to “collect” with the goal of visiting all their works - accepting the logistical challenges - who would it be?

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Another interesting art tour would be to visit all the locations painted by famous landscape artists in order to stand where they stood and see how they interpreted and enhanced the scene, and try to understand what they saw that made them want to paint it. Like Van Gogh’s Yellow House, the Cafe Terrace on the Place du Forum and the Wheat Field with Crows. Cezanne’s Mont Sainte-Victoire. Thomas Richard Parkes Bonington’s Venice Grand Canal.

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Definitely! I’d personally love to travel to Japan to take in all the views of Mount Fuji envisioned by Hokusai and Hiroshige but that’d be incredibly ambitious…

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This is a great question! I’m not sure of exactly how spread out his works are, but I’d love to travel around to see all of Edward Hopper’s paintings. I can’t get enough of his lonely, eerie, almost David Lynch-like windows on the world.

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Then try it in Google Earth. I had made several maps of painting locations which after several years the links to the paintings suddenly broke and rendered them useless. But you can still do it if you find the art online and search for the location in Google Earth, zoom in to the ground and use the compass to raise the horizon and rotate accordingly. The very nature of the map rendering in Google Earth simulates a painting-like environment. And you can activate the photo layer to help find the right view.

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Brilliant mention Jamayzing Clayton ,

I actually read that article in the Guardian a couple of days ago and thought it was a really interesting concept , in fact I’ve been mulling it over in my mind since reading it.

I’m a big fan of Chevalier and have read “Girl with a pearl earring” (My favourite book of hers & love the film too), “The lady and the unicorn” and “Remarkable creatures”.

I think for me , it wouldn’t be one artist in particular but art from a certain time period , basically I would like to see as many of the Magdelanian cave paintings in France that are open to the public. I’m planning to embark on this personal project soon , hopefully.

Totally agree about the Lynchian ambience thing , You can almost imagine some terrifying entities hiding in them somewhere like these

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@JamazingClayton What a beautiful question!
At the risk of sounding cliché, I’d love to see all of the Picassos. I just relocated to Los Angeles, and I got to see this piece from his blue period at the LA County Museum of Art.

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Thats a noble goal but I have to say that it would probably take more than a lifetime though Alisson , Picasso created over 50,000 artworks

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You’re right :smile: But as far as things go, it definitely wouldn’t be the worst thing to devote my life to! If I had to narrow it down, I could say his blue period-- it’s my favorite.

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Oh I totally agree , I would be happy to spend lifetimes contemplating Picasso’s art , he was a genius

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Good idea, @PragmaticStatist! :grinning: Even so, I’d still love to go to Japan for real and experience it in reality. (Heading over there is a lifetime ambition.) As the article says, nothing can really beat being physically in the room - as it were - with an artistic masterpiece. Failing that, I’ll hit Google Earth!

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Picasso would be a good travel companion! Thinking on it, I’d probably go for Hieronymus Bosch or Bruegel the Elder. A couple of my personal favourites, and semi-achievable… :laughing:

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In my younger days I went to MOMA in NYC and found it disappointing. The crowds didn’t allow me as a young graphic designer the time to study the art. It was more like passing an ad at a train station because I brought my kids who had absolutely no interest at all. On the other hand I got a lot out of Paul Klee’s book The Thinking Eye where he broke down his composition and logic. The image I liked most was his sailing boats 1927. His book was like a technical manual of art that I really had a hard time understanding at the time, 30 years later it made a lot more sense when I decided to re-read it.

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The best bet to see both of those is in Madrid , in El Prado. You will find Brueghel’s “Triumph of Death” (my god, its an incredible painting !) and Bosch’s “Garden of Earthly Delights” (Mindblowing , could easily spend an hour contemplating details/images).

Also in Lazaro Galdiano Museum and the Palace of El Escorial , there are more minor works of Bosch

Then fast forward a couple of hundred years and Picasso’s “Guernica” is just across the road at the Reina Sofia museum.

It might sound eccentric but its worth visiting Madrid just for the Art.

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Oh Bosch is another great pic that I’d love to chase around. I’ve always wanted to visit this place:

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Beside Van Gogh, the street art from Banksy would be a favourite for me. You can see at the same time the work of art and the location it was painted at :wink: I’ve seen some in Chicago, UK, and some in muséums, but I still prefer the ones on the street.

Enzo Rhode-Hagen

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I’d want to see all of John Singer Sargent’s portraits. His genius for capturing what was beneath the surface has always captivated me. I’ve seen exhibits of his work in various New York City venues and at the Clark in Williamstown, MA, and I have the beautiful volumes of his portraits edited by his grand-nephew Richard Ormond, but I’d love to see them all “in the flesh” someday.

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I am actually also on a quest to see all of Vermeer’s paintings. Only at 18 right now, but there is hope! I could spend hours in front of each. There is just so much going on. It’s hard to pick favorites because each work has such personality. It’s hard to believe Vermeer was forgotten.

Also trying to see all Artrmisia Gentileschi paintings, but only at 7 there.

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@JamazingClayton Have you seen this project? One Hundred Famous Views of Edo by Kichiya | Nippon.com

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