Historically Important Restaurants

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foods
history
restaurant
restaurants
#9

Old Ebbitt Grill in Washington DC.

The knock against this place is that it has moved locations a few times, but the history is still compelling. Many important people in US history ate, drank or stayed at the boarding house. Back before the days of intensive secret service details and security protocols it wasn’t unusual for a President to walk over from the white house for a drink. Several US presidents were regulars.

In this day and age it’s hard to imagine walking down to your local bar and seeing a current President of the United States sitting at the bar with a beer.

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#10

The Knife and Fork Inn in Atlantic City, New Jersey

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#11

This one is a place I just submitted for addition. The original name is the New Hall Inn, but it’s called The Hole in T’ Wall. It’s located in Bowness upon Lake Windermere in England. It is a pub opened in 1612 and has been in continuous operation since. It’s claim to fame so to speak is that Charles Dickens frequented the establishment while staying nearby on his extended trip to Cumbria. It’s a beautiful old pub in it’s own right with a colorful history. Originally the pub was separated from the blacksmith’s shop next door by a common brick wall. At some point a hole was knocked in the wall so that the blacksmith could reach through and have a beer while he was working. Hence the pub became known by it’s moniker.

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#12

This is awesome!

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#13

Lhardy, was inaugurated in 1839. It is one of the oldest restaurants in Madrid

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#14

+1 for St Peter’s in Salzburg

And for just remote funkiness

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#15

Griechenbeisl in Austria is also a fun one - it’s a little touristy, but only because it’s been visited by some of the world’s greats! Vienna’s oldest tavern has served everyone from Mozart to Mark Twain to Johnny Cash, and those famous guests left their signatures on the walls for ordinary guests like us to see.

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#16

The Golden Lamb in Lebanon, Ohio. Twelve presidents and numerous other famous types have visited here.

https://www.goldenlamb.com/

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#17

I dont know what that spherical object is but it looks like baked goodness :stuck_out_tongue_closed_eyes:

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#18

Fraunces Tavern, if you’re in NYC - it’s a Colonial-era tavern/restaurant (54 Pearl St / @ corner of Pearl and Broad) two blocks from the Stock Exchange/Wall St/Federal Hall. Founded in 1762, it’s where members of the Continental Congress met - George Washington included. It’s both frequented by locals as well as tourists and is a great place to stop in if you’re visiting the city. The restaurants on Stone Street (practically hidden from view, but just around the corner) are also well worth checking out even if they aren’t historically important).

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#19

Agree about St. Peter in Salzburg. The lore around it is that it’s where Mephistopheles met Faust, which happens to be my last name. We made a reservation when we went there, and when we told them our last name they kind of rolled their eyes, like, “ha ha…good one.” Anyway it’s a cool place!

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#20

The first that comes to mind is the Med (Caffe Mediterraneum) in Berkeley – but unfortunately it closed down in 2016. It was famous for being a gathering spot for beat poets and activists in the 1960s, and it’s where Allen Ginsberg wrote Howl. I never ate there when it was open, but I did visit because it’s where my psychology professor at UC Berkeley held his office hours!

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#21

In Bruges, you can still drink/eat in the oldest pub in the city, opened in 1515:
http://www.cafevlissinghe.be/cafevlissinghe.be/home_EN.html

Enzo Rhode-Hagen

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#22

Another place of historical importance, not so much for food, but to have witnessed meetings that may have change the world for some decenials to come afterwards, is ‘Le Cygne’ on the Grand’Place (Main Square).
This is where Marx and Engels used to meet, and where the ‘Manifesto’ was written.
https://www.lamaisonducygne.com/history

Enzo Rhode-Hagen

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#23

In Modena, there is La Piola. It is not only interesting because Enzo Ferrari used to go there quite often, but because they serve food that poor people from the end of the 1800’s beginning of the 1900’s used to eat. As it is poor people’s kitchen, there is almost no butter, etc… Even the dessert is made with Balsamic vinegar :wink: It is quite good, but prices are not for poor people anymore…

http://www.lapiola.eu

Enzo Rhode-Hagen

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#24

In Mexico city there are a lot of historically important resteraunts /cafes / cantinas.

The first one that comes to mind is “Casa de Los Azulejos” (House of tiles) a couple of blocks from the Zocalo in the Historic centre. It was built back when the country was still a colony of Spain. Back in the time of the “Gallegos” (** I use the Mexican nickname for Spanairds with affection , not mockery , they were my ancestors on that side) as it was a private house , then sometime in the 19th century it became a fashionable sanborn’s restauraunt which it still is to this day. It has a lot of history because it was a gathering place for the pre-revolutionary elite and then for revolutionaries during the Mexican revolution when Zapata’s forces invaded the city. There are some pretty interesting photo’s taken of these sombrero wearing moustachioed revolutionaries with their bullet vests and rifles eating meals that they would have probably never even contemplated getting the chance to eat pre-revolution. There is also a beautiful mural by the muralist Orozco on one of the walls and the food is excellent , particularly the “Pollo con Mole” , “Sopa Azteca” and “Enchiladas suizas” , plus you get coffee refills on the house so if you buy one coffee you can have about 50 refills without paying a peso more.

Cafe La Habana is another one , it’s not exactly the most beautiful restaurant around but it has a lot of history and is very atmospheric. It’s a restaurant that was opened by Cuban exiles from the dictatorship of Fulencio Batista back in the 1940’s and has a lot of history intimately linked with that of Cuba. Back in the 50’s it was here that Fidel Castro and Che Guevara could be found most afternoons discussing their plans/ strategy for the Cuban revolution. It wasnt just a haunt of revolutionaries though , lots of writers and artists used to hang out here to talk literature including : Juan Rulfo , Rufino Tamayo , Gabriel Garcia Marquez , Jose Clemente Orozco , Octavio Paz , Miguel Asturias , Julio Cortazar, Carlos Fuentes etc.

Cafe Tacuba is another gem , I think it opened in the 1910’s but not too sure. Its a really beautiful place to sit and have a coffee or meal , very atmospheric and with a strong vintage feel. Diego Riviera and Frida used to come here to have a nightcap. The walls are painted with murals showing the history of Mexico , so you can sit and drink a traditional Meso-American style caocao drink or coffee and contemplate a scene of Cortez meeting Moctezuma or the war of independance against Spain etc.

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#25

Yeah this really should be a AO/Go entry

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#26

@tralfamadore These are AMAZING suggestions! I’m familiar with the infamy of Hofsbrauhaus (shout-out to my High School AP European History Class), that will most definitely be a stop if I ever find myself in Munich.

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#27

@kld123 My fiance I actually just moved to Los Angeles, so the next time his dad is in town, Philippe’s will be a must-see! This is the first I’m hearing of it, so thank you for helping me acquaint myself with my new city!

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#28

@Josh Ugh don’t you just hate that??? It literally makes my heart ache.

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