Introducing the Gastro Obscura New Flavors Club!

Welcome to the Gastro Obscura New Flavors Club, a new recurring feature here on our Community forums where we encourage you to go out and try a new food, and come back to tell us about your experience! Through sharing our stories of culinary discovery, we not only hope to encourage everyone to get out there and expand their palates, but also to help one another to discover new foods that we might not even have known of before.

(Image: Ethan Sexton/Public Domain)

Here’s how it’ll work: We’ll post a thread suggesting a new type of food to go out and try (i.e., fruit, pasta, cocktails, holiday-themed food, etc.), and then we want you to go out find some type of food in that category that you’ve never tried and give it a shot. We’ll also throw out some suggestions for incredible foods from Atlas Obscura’s own collection to give you some ideas. Once you’ve been able to try out a new food, come back and tell us about the experience. What you ate, where you found it or what it was like to prepare, and whether you would recommend it to others. We also want to see pictures of you actually trying your new food! We’ll select one of our favorite reader responses, and ask that reader to suggest the next category or food, and away we go on our next culinary adventure!

For this inaugural installment of the New Flavors Club, let’s get that BREAD (did we say that right, kids?)! Over the next couple of weeks we want you to go out and try a type of bread that you’ve never eaten before, then come back and tell us about it! It doesn’t matter if you buy it at the store or bake it yourself, we want to hear about the experience. If you’re not sure what to try, check out some of the greatest breads from our database below. Now enough talking. Let’s eat something new!

And for those looking for even RARER tastes…

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I first encountered Adjaruli Khachapuri in Tblisi. The egg atop was somewhat disconcerting as it was not fully cooked when it arrived, but it cooked itself once it sat awhile on the bubbling cheese. The little restaurant with plastic tables and chairs and laminated menus read under glaring fluorescent lights specialized in several different permutations, all of the ones, shared amongst a group of three, were worth the small price I recall we paid.

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I love bread! Alas, I gave up carbs for Lent. I’ll do this culinary challenge as soon as Easter Sunday hits though. However, here’s a couple of breads I grew up with that I’d challenge others to try - you’d have to get these from an Asian or Filipino grocery store.

Spanish Bread


Image from this website

Kalihim Bread
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Image from this website

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Does bread cheese count as bread?


My Finnish friends have been teasing me with this for years and a couple days ago I found out that my local cheese store sells it. I didn’t get it yet, but I will go out and buy it this weekend. I have the cloudberry jam to eat it with too.

Otherwise, my favorite childhood treat was dorayaki. It was popularized by the beloved anime show Doraemon.

Another favorite of mine is Pão de Queijo. I might try to make them myself one of these days.

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I’m a big fan of bread cheese, it’s also sometimes called squeaky cheese, for reasons I hope you’ll discover!

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Kalihim bread looks delicious!

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It’s not new to me, but I submit for your own bread adventures the humble kolache. I’m a baker at a cafe that specializes in traditional Czech-style sweet kolaches and the new-fangled Texan-style savory kolaches!

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Goodness gracious, it’s almost midnight and I’m salivating over these bread entries, @nagnabodha and @Ssshannon. :bread: :croissant: :moon_cake:

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For the record, barmbrack is delicious. And very easy to make! And delicious with maple butter! 10/10, would definitely recommend. It tastes warm and homey, like a hug.

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I love kolaches. My Dad’s family came from outside Prague and kolaches were a regular part of our holidays. Thanks for carrying on the tradition!

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What do you mean you gave up carbs? There is not you can eat that doesn’t have some level of carbohydrates in it. Except maybe ice, oil, and protein powder. Also, no fiber‽

Finally! Someone who knows about the savory Kolaches! I get some weird looks outside of Texas when I mention that kolaches can be savory too. My favorite is cabbage (sauerkraut) and sausage.

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Pueblo bread or horno bread, so called because it’s baked in the traditional domed horno ovens, is glorious, golden rounds of deliciousness. Sometimes you can find it being sold by the side of the road near the various pueblos of New Mexico, often being sold alongside stews and other offerings.

It’s wonderful used to sop up green chile stew. We buy it every year at the “Indian Village” pavilion at the New Mexico State fair, but it can also be purchased at the Indian Pueblo Culteral Center in Albuquerque.

https://images.app.goo.gl/PjafSyHzesrGfMFr7

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I recently had fatayer at a middle eastern bakery I just discovered in my hometown. I had one with spinach and one with cheese. The cheese one looked very similar to this Georgian bread, but without the egg. The bread part was not that great, but the cheese was!

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It was shorter to type “carbs” than to name the specific carbalicious foods I gave up, mainly bread, pasta and rice, also a few others. It’s been torture but depriving myself sometimes makes me appreciate eating more. :yum:

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I have been obsessed with salt rising bread since I baked my first loaf as a birthday present for my dad last year. He remembers eating the cheese-like toast when his mother (an Appalachian expat) purchased it from a local Michigan bakery in the 60s. What gets me excited about this bread is, first, the crazy, poisonous, naturally-occurring, hydrogen-producing bacteria that create the delicious, delicate cheesy flavor. Second, it’s a truly American fermented food, like the stinky tofu of the West, invented in the absence of commercial yeast. Third, it tastes amazing and unique. I love to eat it, and I love baking it.

Bringing the bacteria to life out of cornmeal is an amazing process. It begins with a mixture of cornmeal, flour, and water or milk, which must be kept around 110 degrees for several hours before it can be mixed with the remaining dough ingredients. The whole process can take up to 24 hours, but you get to feel like a pioneer, a mad scientist, and a master baker!

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This is very cool!

I haven’t had lokshi - a kind of Slovak/Polish flatbread - (lokse in Slovak, I believe) in years. My grandmother made them out of leftover mashed potatoes, flour and salt, thinly rolled out into irregular ovals, then slapped onto a hot cast iron insert on her coal stove. They were cooked until they blistered, then more or less soaked in browned butter. My sisters and I called them “stove rags.” I think about them around Easter time, when I make one or two other Slovak foods from my youth.

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I tried bread cheese last weekend and it was soooo good.
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Pictured here with its companion, the cloudberry preserve. I still have half of bread cheese and will try kaffeost next!

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Oh yum! Kaffeost seems like something I would just… get.

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