Most Incredible Bridges?

Carrbridge in Scotland is really pretty! I also love iconic bridges like the Golden Gate and Sydney Harbour bridge, though. I got goosebumps when I saw the Golden Gate for the first time last year!

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I prefer Beau myself…

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Seven Mile Bridge, from Miami to Key West. Not famous for soaring heights or impressive trestles, Seven Mile Bridge is just that… just miles and miles of tropical paradise.

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This is not far from where I live in Fort Worth, I have been in that part before but never on HWY 16, sounds like a day road trip this summer for me just to have a look at that stone bridge. Thanks for the heads up.
Springer

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I love driving over the Coronado Bridge from San Diego to Coronado (not as good driving in the other direction). It is also beautiful to see from the left seats of an airplane when landing at nearby Lindbergh Field airport.

Last year I got to see the spectacular Storms River Bridge, Tsitsikamma National Park, South Africa (pictured)

. It crosses such a deep gorge that walking across it is a challenge for those with any fear of heights.

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Wow! Wonderful wonderful wonderful. Thanks for sharing and I do love the small obscure bridges shared here.

My favourite, and you can call me biased if you like, is still the Victoria Falls Bridge straddling between Zimbabwe and Zambia - an engineering marvel, especially in 1905 when it was completed. Large pieces were built in the UK and brought in to be assembled from both sides of a 100m gorge (with the Zambezi River roaring below - known for class 5 rapids). The story of it’s construction and the little town is fascinating. Oh, and the view from the bridge is of the deep gorge below on the one side, and then part of the Victoria Falls on the other side - not bad. And if you feel like a little adrenaline rush, you can bungee jump from the middle of the bridge.

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Love this bridge! If you take the dirt road (Old Coast Road) into the canyon a short distance in, you can get a wonderful view of it.

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Oh, good to know. Now just need to find an excuse to go back…

Very, very high on my list of Atlas Obscura places I’d like to see:

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Much love for this bridge, I’d cross it travelling home from university

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I went to Edinburgh as a poor backpacker in 2003, but made a point of taking the local bus out to Queensferry to stand under one of the bridges of my dreams.

Aha I found the pictures!

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The Zhangjiajie glass brige because when you walk across it will look like it’s breaking even though it’s just effects on the brige. It’ll scare the liveing daylights out of you.

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The new eastern span of the Bay Bridge from Oakland to Yerba Buena Island is the largest self-anchored suspension (SAS) bridge and apparently the widest bridge in the world. The SAS section reminds me of a giant harp.

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Excellent photos!

Photos of the Old Tappan Zee Bridge (before the demolition) side-by-side next to the New Tappan Zee Bridge. I took these “shots from a moving car”…from my passenger seat in May of 2018, they demolished the old bridge in January 2019. The Tappan Zee crosses the Hudson River, spanning from Grand View-on-Hudson to Tarrytown, NY.

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Inspired by the Baltimore highway bridge stack above (which I know so well, it meant we were almost at my grandmother’s house), LA has some of the most EPIC ones, like the Pregerson Interchange here:

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The Royal Gorge bridge near Canon City makes the cut

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The Pont de Québec is the last downstream crossing of the St-Lawrence River, just west of Québec City. It was opened almost 100 years ago, in December of 1919, and is still the longest cantilever bridge in the world.

You can get great views of it like this one from the aquarium, just off the northern end. The Pont Pierre-Laporte suspension bridge is behind, which carries the freeway and is what the vast majority of people now use to cross the river.

I’ve always found this bridge very haunting. Largely due to it’s story: it collapsed twice during construction, resulting in 88 fatalities in total. The first failure was a catalyst in improving accountability in North America in the supervision of engineering projects and of engineers themselves.

There’s something about that dark, hulking shape of the bridge and its rusty colour that just feels very ominous, yet in an addicting way. I can never get enough of it. From the first time I was able to see it driving past Québec as a kid I would always try to detour for another look. Even though I’ve taken so many pictures of it already.

I’ve driven across it, taken the train, driven underneath it, but have yet to walk across, that will be the ultimate experience. It’s like a horror movie that keeps pulling you back in. You can’t look at it without thinking about the tragedy that happened, the fact that the original middle section of the bridge is still lying there at the bottom of the river, and the thought that it could somehow happen again.

But of course it has been impeccably safe ever since, and I bet most daily commuters don’t think much of it at all. It’s really just a big hunk of steel. Yet I dare you to get it out of your imagination now.

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In north wales there are two incredible bridges that span the treacherous Menai straits between the main land and the island of ynys môn (Anglesey)
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But they’re not my choice, hidden away in the town of Conway are two other bridges, one a disused mail route (original purpose of the Menai bridge) and a rail way bridge (original use of the britania bridge). Both bridges are in fact prototypes by their respective builders Thomas Telford and Robert Stephenson. The Telford suspension bridge is now a pedestrian path under protection by the national trust whilst the Stephenson bridge is the only tubular bridge of his still standing after a fire broke out on the britania bridge and it was rebuilt. These two are definitely worth visiting to see how these two masters of bridge building practised their craft.image

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Wonderful! They look like dinosaurs tailing each other!

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