Tell Us About the Greatest Animals You've Met On Your Travels

Hahaha ! I didn’t see your comment , great story , I can imagine a taciturn Tico trying to get a sloth to cross the road.

Ive got to hand it to them , in general Ticos are pretty responsible (with some exceptions) when it comes to conserving their fauna.

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I was astounded at how much respect Costa Ricans, across the entire country, had for the environment. Much different than the U.S.!

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Totally agree Schultjh , they are a very positive example in a very troubled region in soooooo many ways.

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Haunting! Love to see the ohotos!

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They used to be animals.


I found many of these taxidermy at the Science Museum of the University of Coimbra.

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Wonderful pictures nagnabodha !

Judging by the mane of the male , the lion picture shows a subspecies which is now very rare in the wild (I think) the Angolan lion , it was almost wiped out by the war in the 70’s and 80’s.

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That’s quite possible, since Angola was colonized by the Portuguese.

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I’m not 100 % sure about it as lions are not really my thing , but the mane on the male specimen is pretty thin and blonde which that subspecies seems to have.

A question , was there lots of African species represented in the taxidermy collection ? or also species from other parts of the world ?

I need to thank you Nagnabodha as your photo has reminded me of something I’ve been thinking of for a while. I’ve been considering adding an entry for France of “Parc Des Felins” where that species is kept. It’s a really beautiful feline conservation centre just outside of Paris in spectacular rural surroundings that maintains breeding groups of most of the worlds endangered wild cat species.

One of the best “Zoos” (I guess I’m uneasy of putting it in that category as it is much more than a zoo and its organizational ethics are astoundingly good) I’ve ever been to. I have very fond memories of being there with my dad a couple of years back when it was pouring down with rain , got soaked to the skin but in spite of the downpour it was a lovely and unforgettable day trip.

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Such a great story! I could definitely imagine how special the experience of waiting for the maned wolf was. And I love old monasteries.

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I read the same book, it’s pretty awesome.

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It is an incredibly beautiful place indeed , here are a couple of pics I took, hope they give an impression of it


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Wow. Love the pics! My dream is to buy an old abbey/monastery or castle, which means it will never happen because they’re usually extremely expensive and hard to maintain, not to mention drafty.

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I can definitely empathise with that impossible goal as I would love to live in an old castle or abbey too , but I’ll have to just make do by visiting them instead , there are so many around the world and they all have their own distinctive characters to them

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@Monsieur_Mictlan Terrific story ! Wonderful photos❣️ - Bear

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Thank you spf50 , not sure I understand what you mean by the “bear” bit though …

It’s not the greatest animal I’ve met, but I remember feeling the greatest pang of anxiety when I saw something jump out of the water while walking near Oncheoncheon Stream in Busan. It was at night, so I couldn’t see what it was. But a swarm of them kept leaping out of the water! Having watched Bong Joon-ho’s “The Host,” I was terrified.

A kind stranger nearby noticed my panic and explained that they’re mullet babies. He said that mullets are fish that live in the sea and when they swim from sea to river, they playfully jump. Some locals believe that the mullets are making other fish in the river hop too!

I found soooooo many theories on why mullets jump. Most practical: to breathe. Most magical: for fun :slight_smile:

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