Tell Us About the Most Incredible Moon You've Ever Seen

One of the most iconic Halloween/October images of our modern age is the image from A Nightmare Before Christmas of Jack Skellington standing atop that magical curling hill, the moon shining like a massive headlight behind him. While that image is a cartoonishly outsized example, few things signal the spoopy season more than a huge moon hanging in the darkness of the night sky. And while most of us might not get to see a moon quite so huge as the one in Danny Elfman’s masterpiece (TIM BURTON WAS ONLY HALF OF THAT MOVIE’S MAGIC!!!), thanks to the phenomenon known as the “moon illusion” we still have the opportunity to witness some stunningly large lunar views. And now, whether it was huge and unforgettable or blindingly bright, we want to hear about the most incredible moon views you’ve ever seen!

(Image: malith dk/Public Domain)

In the thread below, tell us about the most incredible moon you’ve ever seen! Where were you and what time of year was it? What made it so memorable, and what kind of moon was it, full, crescent, etc.? If you have any pictures of the incredible moon, let’s see those too! The nights are getting longer, but show off our incredible lunar memories, and light up the darkness!


Maybe not the most amazing, but I was pretty proud of taking this with nothing but my telescope and phone in my backyard.

3 Likes

I grew up in the Chicago suburbs, in an ugly midcentury apartment complex with a sprawling courtyard in the middle. My friends and I were obsessed with digging through our playground’s sandbox for ‘Indian Clay’ (no clue where we got this idea) and were under strict instructions to return home before the streetlights were lit. We were furiously digging in the twilight when my friend shouted in panic that the lights were already on. I turned suddenly and saw the largest, brightest, tangerine-hued moon. It looked so big that it would overtake us before we returned to our parents, and did, in fact, appear to be getting closer at each moment. I ran through our sliding glass door and breathlessly shouted that something very strange was happening outside. My mother, upon opening the window, ceased scolding and we both stared for the longest time. I thought the moon would be like that forever, and that made me very happy, but it returned to normal within minutes. It remains one of the most marvelous things I’ve ever seen.

1 Like

Highly biased here, but the full moon I got married under on a Friday the 13th. It had rained all day (to be expected in Olympic National Park during the fall), but just as the ceremony was about to start, the clouds opened up and this beautiful silver circle shone through. I remember looking up and seeing the edges of the clouds as they were blown out of the way, and they were all silver-edged in the darkness… A perfect frame. I kind of felt like she was saying, “I’m the Moon, and I approve this marriage.”

3 Likes

A full moon with two circular rainbows around it!

1 Like

We were camping on the beach in Baja in February 20-21, 2008. The first night a huge, beautiful moon rose in the eastern sky and flooded the beach, the sea, and the nearby islands in moonlight. It was magnificent. The next night there was a full lunar eclipse and a level of darkness I have rarely experienced. The stars and visible planets were brilliant. We could see nebulas with cheap binoculars. The contrast of the two evenings, light and dark, was magical.

2 Likes

In 1954 I heard that there was going to be an eclipse of the moon in the Arizona desert, so I stayed up to watch. The moon turned blood red. It looked exactly like a red balloon hanging over the town. It was in the news for days. Everybody was amazed. Nobody had ever seen such a thing before.

Astronomers suggested that the Earth’s atmosphere had acted as a lens, focusing red light on the moon but not other colors. Now the effect is passed off as old hat, as if they knew it all along.

1 Like

“Winter solstice tonight- the sun has never been farther away than it is now. It is something that has been observed for thousands of years; the darkest night of the year. It is part of a primordial cycle that never ends. Nothing is more reliable, partnered with day and night, moon and sun. This year, solstice is paired with another astronomical phenomenon, a total lunar eclipse. Last night, the moon’s orbit took it through the shadow of our world. Unfortunately, I wasn’t able to see it through the snow and cloud that came to spoil the experience that night, but it did make me think of another eclipse, though only a partial one, that I saw clearly- all too clearly- back in 2003. My father had just passed away the days before, and we had just gotten home from his wake. It had been a long, laborious day- too much energy spent penting up emotions, too many emotions to keep pent up. I remember getting out of the car that cold night, and looking up at the sky; half the moon disappeared into darkness. It was no crescent. A part of it was lost to sight; no earthshine, no light reaching it at all. Nothing had ever looked so malevolent. Here I was down here on earth, half of my world gone, and there was the moon, the exact allegory of my loss. I couldn’t bear to look at it long, but its presence was ominous, as if it was following me to the door. I opened that door, went inside, and immediately forgot about it. Until today.” from my blog: Tilinance

1998 Mamallapuram, India on the roof of my small hotel chatting with some amazing fellow travelers and watching a huge, blood red moon rise over the Bay of Bengal/Indian Ocean. Spectacular and unforgettable!

1 Like

It was many years ago, and I, a flat-lander by birth, had just moved to the desert Southwest. I was enchanted by the mountains that border the east edge of town (actually, I still am!). Then one night, the moon rose over the mountains in mid-eclipse. It was a deep dusky red and the mountains were a deep dusky purple, barely showing up against the black sky. But everything was sharply outlined, thanks to the dry air. I have photos but on film. That’s how long ago it was!

1 Like

In the summertime, when the moon is full, I will sometimes take my motorcycle out on a back country road. Turning off the headlight and just leaving the running light on, the road appears as a silver ribbon unwinding beneath the motorcycle tires. It provides an otherworldly feel, an escape into a mystical realm. I inadvertently discovered this during my high school years, probably 50 years ago. And even after all this time, it always provides the same delightful experience.

Whether the name is a coincidence or not, here is a picture I took in Moon Valley, Atacama Desert, with the moon (allthough small) perfectly aligned with Licancabur Volcano

3 Likes

The moon viewed from the desert Southwest can be stunning in its beauty, surprisingly so. In the pre-dawn, driving along the Rio Grande on my way to work I noticed the moon on its way to the the horizon – it was peacock blue, a pale shade bur definitely blue! . I pulled over and snapped a picture of it but it was a cheap camera didn’t have the capability to capture delicate palate of that early morning. Even though the colors don’t show in the photo, that scene is beautifully and forever rendered in my memory.
%20jpg|376x500

2 Likes

I love the moon and have been blessed with seeing some really magnificent moons, but my favorite full moon memory is this. A full moon, blood moon eclipse was predicted while I happened to be staying at the New Mexico State Park, Elephant Butte Lake. An avid kayaker, I took the opportunity to kayak out as the sun lowered and then, from the lake, gently rocking in my kayak, I watched as the moon rose over the mountains behind the lake and turned red in the twilight, with the deep blues, purples and red reflected in the water around me. There would be no way to capture that except in memory and so it is.

Thank you, everyone, for sharing these beautiful memories.

2 Likes

Not very clear, but I took these in Brimley, MI at my cabin outside of Sault Ste. Marie. It was definitely the most incredible moon I’ve ever seen!

IMG_1665 IMG_1671 IMG_1672 [quote=“EricGrundhauser, post:1, topic:27900, full:true”]
One of the most iconic Halloween/October images of our modern age is the image from A Nightmare Before Christmas of Jack Skellington standing atop that magical curling hill, the moon shining like a massive headlight behind him. While that image is a cartoonishly outsized example, few things signal the spoopy season more than a huge moon hanging in the darkness of the night sky. And while most of us might not get to see a moon quite so huge as the one in Danny Elfman’s masterpiece (TIM BURTON WAS ONLY HALF OF THAT MOVIE’S MAGIC!!!), thanks to the phenomenon known as the “moon illusion” we still have the opportunity to witness some stunningly large lunar views. And now, whether it was huge and unforgettable or blindingly bright, we want to hear about the most incredible moon views you’ve ever seen!

(Image: malith dk/Public Domain)

In the thread below, tell us about the most incredible moon you’ve ever seen! Where were you and what time of year was it? What made it so memorable, and what kind of moon was it, full, crescent, etc.? If you have any pictures of the incredible moon, let’s see those too! The nights are getting longer, but show off our incredible lunar memories, and light up the darkness!
[/quote]

3 Likes

Although this may be a different kind of moon view, my observation of the last total solar eclipse in Nashville, will live in my memory for ever .

4 Likes

I just can’t describe how much beautiful and unforgettable moon look was it!
Unfortunately, i hadn’t had my Canon with me. I stopped there in the middle of night gazing on it and feeling its beauty, peace, clarity and even its smell.
Why don’t days go back so I can see that incredible seen again! :pensive:

Three years ago I captured this double rainbow around the moon

3 Likes

Oooooo! Moon rainbows!

1 Like

Almost couldn’t believe my eyes. Full moon at that, 2 rainbows. Here’s another view

2 Likes