The Well of the Miracle

According to La Razón, the instagramers have focused on the Well of Miracles, lately

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I would like to know more about this, but my Spanish is minimal. Any English-language info?

The traslation of the article could be as follows:

"No more and no less than 438 miracles are attributed to San Isidro, of which, curiously, four are related to the existence of wells. Some of these wells that supposedly had some kind of relationship with San Isidro can be found in the Church of Santa María la Antigua. This temple, from the 13th century, is located next to the Carabanchel cemetery, and houses a medieval well inside. Another is the one that is currently preserved under the Chapel of the Immaculate Conception, in the Royal Collegiate Church of San Isidro, on Toledo Street.

As can be seen, many of these miraculous acts of San Isidro have survived to this day, transmitted orally. However, it is impossible for the vast majority to locate them in space, since, as we have seen, there are plenty of “scenarios”, that is, wells. However, due to its surroundings, in one of the most touristic and gastronomic areas of the capital, tourists and “cats” (the colloquial name of inhabitants of Madrid) have agreed that this secluded museum of La Latina, where one of the main houses of the Vargas family was located, is the “space " from the well. If we visit this more than recommendable San Isidro museum, which hosts the origins of Madrid, in one of its last rooms, in a small austere-looking room, we see the curb of a well, today covered for security reasons. In it the miracle took place in which it is affirmed that San Isidro saved his son from drowning.

According to tradition, while the current patron saint of Madrid was working the fields, his wife, Santa María de la Cabeza, and his son, Illán, stayed at his house. In an careless of her, the boy rushed into the well, 27 meters deep, dooming him to certain death. When San Isidro arrived he found his wife desperate for him and lamenting the misfortune that had occurred. At that moment San Isidro began to pray to the Virgin of the Almudena (Madrid’s local Virgin) with a high dose of faith so that she would intercede for his son, and so it was. At that moment the water level began to rise until the child came out, safe and sound, to the surface. So, Saint Isidro was able to save his son.

The relationship between San Isidro and water apparently goes way back since it is said that the patron saint of Madrid was a dowser before he was a farmer. And that, as a result of this trade, was the openNo more and no less than 438 miracles are attributed to San Isidro, of which, curiously, four are related to the existence of wells. Some of these wells that supposedly had some kind of relationship with San Isidro can be found in the Church of Santa María la Antigua. This temple, from the 13th century, is located next to the Carabanchel cemetery, and houses a medieval well inside. Another is the one that is currently preserved under the Chapel of the Immaculate Conception, in the Royal Collegiate Church of San Isidro, on Toledo Street.

As can be seen, many of these miraculous acts of San Isidro have survived to this day, transmitted orally. However, it is impossible for the vast majority to locate them in space, since, as we have seen, there are plenty of “scenarios”, that is, wells. However, due to its surroundings, in one of the most touristic and gastronomic areas of the capital, tourists and “cats” (the colloquial name of inhabitants of Madrid) have agreed that this secluded museum of La Latina, where one of the main houses of the Vargas family was located, is the “space " from the well. If we visit this more than recommendable San Isidro museum, which hosts the origins of Madrid, in one of its last rooms, in a small austere-looking room, we see the curb of a well, today covered for security reasons. In it the miracle took place in which it is affirmed that San Isidro saved his son from drowning.

According to tradition, while the current patron saint of Madrid was working the fields, his wife, Santa María de la Cabeza, and his son, Illán, stayed at his house. In an careless of her, the boy rushed into the well, 27 meters deep, dooming him to certain death. When San Isidro arrived he found his wife desperate for him and lamenting the misfortune that had occurred. At that moment San Isidro began to pray to the Virgin of the Almudena (Madrid’s local Virgin) with a high dose of faith so that she would intercede for his son, and so it was. At that moment the water level began to rise until the child came out, safe and sound, to the surface. So, Saint Isidro was able to save his son.

The relationship between San Isidro and water apparently goes way back since it is said that the patron saint of Madrid was a dowser before he was a farmer. And that, as a result of this trade, was the opening of numerous wells throughout the city and its surroundings. The matter is not trivial, after all, in the coat of arms of the Villa you can read “I was built on water”, something that is reaffirmed with its Arabic name, Magerit (from Mayrit) “land rich in water”, or the Mozarabic "Matrice ”, which means source.
ing of numerous wells throughout the city and its surroundings. The matter is not trivial, after all, in the coat of arms of the Villa you can read “I was built on water”, something that is reaffirmed with its Arabic name, Magerit (from Mayrit) “land rich in water”, or the Mozarabic “Matrice ”, which means source”.

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Thanks so much, Luis! More for my Travel list – must-see places!

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