Time to Show Us the Greatest Monumental Clocks!

London’s Big Ben is not a clock, it is the bell.

Yes. I love this one.

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The Zimmer clock in Lier Belgium was constructed in the 1930’s and installed in a tower that was originally a medieval keep. It features 12 dials that show the locations of the planets, phases of the moon. the zodiac and much more. And, you can sit in the square sipping a Belgian ale while watching it.

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Old Town Riga has three different clocks that impressed me in different ways.

There is a beautiful blue and gold astronomical clock on the facade of the House of the Blackheads, a merchant guild house which is itself one of the architectural gems of Riga. The original house was built in 1334, but razed by the Soviets after it was damaged in World War II. The house was rebuilt from 1996 to 1999.

Although Riga is known for its hundreds of Art Nouveau buildings, one of its features is the Laima Clock, an Art Deco piece that was built to advertise the Laima Confectionary Company in 1924. It is just down the street from Riga’s Freedom Monument, a signature monument that somehow escaped Soviet destruction during the post-WWII occupation.

And there is a large universal sundial on the plaza in front of the Riga train station. As long as you know what day it is, and the sun is shining, you can position yourself accordingly and the sundial will tell you the time. Around the rim of the sundial, you’ll also see the distance to other European cities.

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Tallest four face clock in the world

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image The Eastgate Clock, Chester, UK. https://images.app.goo.gl/6i6JeMCRThcf9nmC7. Eastgate and Eastgate Clock - Wikipedia. From my beautiful home city of Chester in England, UK.
As a small child in the 60s, I would often walk around the ancient city fortress walls with my father and grandfather starting from the clock in Eastgate street. I would love to stand behind the rails under the clock and watch the bustling crowds below doing their shopping. Christmas was my favourite time because the festive lights made it seem magical! !

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When strolling through Tbilisi in the beautiful country of Georgia in 2016, we came across the most quirky and lovely leaning clock tower. It is called შავთელის ქუჩა, გაბრიაძის თეატრი in Georgian. The clock tower is located next to the Gabriadze theater in the city center and was created by its namesake, the famous Georgian puppet maker Rezo Gabriadze. Every hour, a window opens at the top and an angel strikes the bell. Below the clock, a screen opens and shows the circle of life with a young couple, marriage, babies and a funeral. The photos are my own, unfortunately I forgot to take pictures during the hourly puppet show.



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The Andalusian Clock of Testour, Tunisia. The numbers are in reverse order and it runs backwards.
The clock is in the minaret of the 16th-century Grand Mosque; it is extremely rare for a minaret to have a clock. The minaret was built by Muslim refugees from al-Andalus, Spain, with help from Jewish refugees from the same area.
A popular legend says that the clock runs in reverse to symbolize the longing of the refugees to return to their homeland, but in reality no one knows.

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That’s lovely!

This is the one I thought of! I used to drive past it every day when I worked in Milwaukee.

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There’s a clock like this in Milwaukee? I took this photo in Tunisia!

I replied to a different photo in the same thread, of the Allen Bradley 4-sided clock in Milwaukee. :slight_smile:

Not stunning to look at, but the Shepherd’s Gate Clock at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich is nifty because it IS what time it is.

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The astrological clock in Strasbourg, France. Here’s what the website says:
image
The first Strasbourg astronomical clock, L’horloge de Trois Rois , was being built from 1352 till 1354, but it stopped working in the beginning of 16th century. This first clock was equipped with various mechanical details that were very rare in that time, such as calendar and astrolabe, as well as very interesting miniature statues. The present mechanism dates from 1842 and is especially attractive for the work of its automatons, which, every day at 12.30 pm, all start their show. At this moment, astronomical clock offers you a view of different stages of life, which are personified by a child, a teenager, an adult and an old man, who pass before Death. Above this are the apostles who walk before Christ. Their passage is punctuated by the beatings of wings and the song of a large rooster. In front of the clock is the marvellous Pillar of Angels, which, in a very original manner, represents the Last Judgment.

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It’s not the biggest clock but it is sure my favourite if that counts…
It’s The Gastown steam clock in Vancouver it’s a world first in its genre so it’s pretty amazing :exploding_head:
Gastown steam clockls

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Horologium mirabile Lundense, Lund Cathedral, Sweden. No big crowds and you can get a close, detailed look at it. " The clock plays a traditional Christmas carol ( In Dulci Jubilo , dating from the Middle Ages) from the smallest organ in the church twice a day, at 12:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m."

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Real good write-up in the article, but I noticed a mistake. The picture of Pachuca is credited to “Trabajo Propio”. That just means “own work”, the actual author is Diego Delso.

https://es.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archivo:Reloj_Monumental,_Pachuca,_Hidalgo,_México,_2013-10-10,_DD_05.JPG

It’s not a mechanical clock, but the sundial at Queen’s College, Cambridge is worth a look. Installed in 1642, it resides on the inside of the Old Court. It shows time by the sun, but also the time at night by the moon, adjusted by a factor from the chart underneath. It also shows the sign of the Zodiac, length of the day, time of sunrise, altitude and azimuth of the sun, the Julian date, and “unequal hours.” It’s also beautiful. Here’s how to read it, should you visit.

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The City Clock in Rome, GA, USA sits high on one of Rome’s “7 hills” atop an old brick water tower and has dominated the skyline since 1872. The tower is occasionally open to visitors who can climb the 107 steps to the top for commanding views.

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Fes, Morocco
The clock consists of 13 windows and platforms carrying brass bowls. The motion of the clock was presumably maintained by a kind of small cart which ran from left to right behind twelve doors. At one end, the cart was attached to a rope with a hanging weight; at the other end to a rope with a weight that floated on the surface of a water reservoir that was drained at a regular pace. Each hour one of the doors opened; at the same time a metal ball was dropped into one of the twelve brass bowls. The rafters sticking out of the building above the doors are identical to the rafters of the Bouinania Madrasa (Islamic school) and originally supported a small roof to shield the doors and bowls.

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