Who wants to watch the Total Solar Eclipse in Pisco Elqui, Chile — July 2, 2019?

travel
eclipse
group-trip
#1

I’ve been thinking of forming a group trip to Pisco Elqui, Chile for the July 2nd Total Solar Eclipse. I’m thinking a small group of 10-14 people. If I get enough interest, I will plan the entire trip, set up accommodations, activities, and flights.

If interested, you can email me at: erik@spaceably.com

Related Article (and possible upcoming group trips to other eclipses):
https://medium.com/@erikblair/7-awesome-locations-to-watch-incredible-solar-eclipses-2019-to-2028-296fb5791d7f

1 Like

#2

Hey Erik, that guy on Medium looks vaguely like you.
Have you inquired about accommodations for 10-14 in Elqui? I ask because it was my understanding any affordable place near the centerline for just 1-2, was snapped up a year ago.

1 Like

#3

I was hoping to have a conversation about the Medium article, but it doesn’t look like that is going to happen soon. I will just say it doesn’t match my traveling style.

Edited to remove solar eclipse travel plan criticisms. Deleted text appears in Erik’s reply.

0 Likes

#4

Yes, that guy looks exactly like me. I have not looked into accommodations at all. Not yet anyway. I’m probably late to the game…

0 Likes

#5

In response to your comment, “I was hoping to have a conversation about the Medium article, but it doesn’t look like that is going to happen soon. I will just say it doesn’t match my traveling style.

The beauty of travel is that each of us has the freedom to have our own style. Hope to meet up with you in the path of an eclipse!

Aloha

0 Likes

#6

Great to hear from you Erik!
I am a little disappointed with myself for not waiting longer to hear from you before posting my last message.
I have removed the post-2024 references from that post in the hopes of improving the conversation on events occurring in the nearer future.

I would tend to agree that it is starting to get a little late for Elqui 2019 for anyone who can’t afford to fly their Learjet there.
I also completely agree that total eclipses are an great way to learn about places one might not otherwise even be aware of, with an eye towards visiting there.
As a matter of fact, the only point that I might disagree about is that because solar eclipse totality is such a powerful, but short-lived, ephemeral and fleeting experience that serves to remind a person of their place in the larger global and even heavenly events going on around them, that it should not be squandered. As you know, there is a long lead-up, and then boom, it’s all over. And those who only got to experience a partial, have no sense of what just happened.

Are you seriously considering Enchanted Rock TX for 2024? I think that place has the potential for a truly magical experience. I am interested in hearing anything more about your plans.

0 Likes

#7

I hear you. I’ll edit my response as well. I appreciate your input.
I agree. Totality is an unmatched experience.
I’m not entirely sure what will happen in 2024. It’s #1 on my list at this point. It would be great to meet you there, then. I just can’t say for sure at this point. It’s definitely worth planning!
Feel free to keep in touch. My email is erik@spaceably.com . I plan to share more travel plans on my Medium articles in the future – https://medium.com/@erikblair/

0 Likes

#8

Medium site is bookmarked, and I will check it often.

I have used Atlas Obscura as a resource for years, but I just joined the forum in the hopes of starting an eclipse discussion.
I am planing an extended Texas/Coahuila scouting trip in April 2020. But until I get a better sense for the area, the part of US that seems to have the most potential is a little closer to the Mexican border. I plan to post a complete report after returning.

My three rules for eclipse travel are as follows: Unobstructed totality duration trumps everything.

  1. Climate rules over all other considerations, no matter how compelling another place may be.
  2. Duration rules over all remaining considerations. Be as close to the centerline in the area as possible.
  3. Given the two previous immutable constraints, choose the most interesting remaining destination.
    Particularly somewhere with unique natural or cultural features. A prominence with a wide vista of the approaching shadow path and large features to the rear is always nice.

A possible corollary to rule number one is, in the event of any ambiguity in the weather/visibility prospects, have an alternate escape plan.

edited for a couple of minor spelling/grammar corrections.

2 Likes

#9

Solid criteria! Look forward to keeping in touch… Aloha

1 Like